Coffee Table Tutorial

For more background on this table, check out part 1 here.  This table is so cool and I feel like you need to know how cool it is too. So definitely read our first post for all the history:) Our ultimate goal was to totally change the base and make it even more unique since it came off of a cargo ship! See, cool...right?
For a refresher, here is the before and after!
So to make this table base this is what you need! (We worked with everything in 1" diameter and our coffee table dimensions are 27" wide x 60" long. So you may need to adjust if you are working with a different width)
First thing you need to know is that pipes that are less than 12" are called nipples. This will help you immensely when searching hardware store websites :) 
1- super cool coffee table top
2 -18" black iron pipes
4- 8" black steel nipples
4 - 5" black steel nipples
4 - 6" black steel nipples
4 - iron tee fittings
4- 90° iron elbow fittings 
8 - iron cap fittings
12 - galvanized steel pipe straps
4- 2.5" bolts with nuts 3/16" diameter
24- 1.5 screws
1 piece of barnwood the same length as table. Width can vary. 
Ok, you have your supplies! Here is what you do next. 
1) Clean all the oil off the iron pipes
2) Start building the legs. First, Screw the 5" nipples into each tee. Connect the other end of the tee to the 8" nipple as shown below.
3) At the top of each leg, connect an elbow. 
4) At the elbows, screw in the 6" nipples at the top of each leg. We did this instead of making it a completely closed shape at the top. This way is much easier...I promise. 
5) If you look closely at the top of the leg you will notice the elbow touches the bottom of the table but the pipe itself does not. To even this out, put a cap at the end of each 6" nipple. You also need a cap at the bottom of each leg.
6) The last pipe you need is the one that will connect the two legs on each side. Screw in the 18" pipe into the tee to connect two of the legs. Once you do this, you will have two complete legs!
7) Now you can use all your straps and start putting the legs on the bottom side of the table. We put the legs at a 22 degree angle. Since everyone does straight legs, this was more fun :) To do that, you need to put the center of the pipe 7.5" away from the edge of the table and angle the legs out so they are even with the table top. 
8) Cut yourself a piece of wood, or use a scrap piece of barn wood like we did for a shelf. We used a metal bit and screwed through the wood and pipe and used the bolts and nuts to attach. We also used additional straps to help lock it all in place. 
VOILA...a super easy table base!
 

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2 comments
  • Rachel- All of the metal components cost approximately $180.

    Nicole @ Rescued Furnishings on
  • what is the estimated cost of supplies?

    Rachel on

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